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Gensler Building 2008 GreenUnited Kingdom- Gensler’s design for Herman Miller’s international headquarters, also called Village Green, has been short listed for Corenet’s 2008 Sustainability award and is the first building in the UK to receive both BREEAM (excellent rating) and LEED (gold) accreditation. The 20,000-square foot facility is located in Chippenham, England.

Several notable details that make Village Green green and intelligent:

  • Natural ventilation. A computerized system adjusts airflow, eliminating the need for air conditioning.
  • All timber is from FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) sustainable sources.
  • Recycled aggregate building materials are sourced from within 30 kilometers.
  • All carpeting is recyclable.
  • Energy-efficient lighting is activated by movement sensors.
  • Seventy-five percent of the building is exposed to natural daylight and 95 percent of the office space includes a view of the outside.
  • Cycle racks and showers are provided to encourage alternative transportationInteriors

‘Village Green provides an efficient and dynamic work environment for employees and it also has become a popular customer destination,’ says John Portlock, president of Herman Miller International. ‘It also serves as a living case study about the possibilities that exist with sustainable design.’

Read more: Gensler short listed for Corenet’s 2008 Sustainability award

 

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Nanocity- the idea of a sustainable city ‘with world class infrastructure and to create an ecosystem for innovation leading to economy, ecology and social cohesion’ is taking place near another architecture paradise- Chandigarh, which was commissioned by first prime minister of independent India to reflect new nation’s modern and progressive outlook. Nehru famously proclaimed Chandigarh to be ‘unfettered by the traditions of the past, a symbol of the nation’s faith in the future.’

In 1966 French architect Le Corbusier and his team produced a plan for Chandigarh that conformed to the modernist city planning principles of CIAM, in terms of division of urban functions, an anthropomorphic plan form, and a hierarchy of road and pedestrian networks. Chandigarh, for a very long time, was perceived to be an experimental city!

Today after forty some years, Sabeer Bhatia [of Hotmail fame] has embarked upon another multi-billion dollar Nanocity idea in collaboration with Government of Haryana [India] and the faculty and students of UC Berkeley, California [USA]. Nanocity will replicate if not surpass the standards of the Silicon Valley of US.

Nanocity

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AREAS CONSIDERED FOR ECOTOWNS IN UKJuly 2007- Britian had announced that it will initiate ‘zero carbon’ architecture and town planning by building 5 ‘Ecotowns’ to meet their demand for 2 million new homes by 2016.

‘The towns, each with a minimum of 5,000 to 10,000 houses, will be built to meet zero carbon standards and will each showcase a specific project promoting energy preservation or green technology. Projects to be showcased could include use of communal heat pump systems or car pool schemes,’ the Communities and Local government office said.

UK government even launched a Architecture Design Competition and invited entries for design and layouts of Ecotowns.

You can view the Ecotown prospectus here.

 

NO ECOTOWN HERE

While the government offices move ahead with their plans, people have opposed the plans. People of Warwickshire threaten to march in protest. OPPOSITION to a proposed 6,000-home eco-town at Long Marston also intensified this week as a second Conservative MP came out against the scheme and a petition appealing directly to Prime Minister Gordon Brown appeared on the website of 10 Downing Street. You can read more here: Risible Claims for Ecotown and Protest over plans for Ecotown


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This week while China was in the limelight with its ‘blue box beating with a green heart’- the Water Cube ‘National Aquatics Centre in Beijing’, Korea’s one-hundred-and-five-story Ryugyong Hotel got a severe blow in the architecture world. It was declared the ‘worst building ever’. Esquire says ‘Picture doesn’t lie.

Aerial View from Google‘the one-hundred-and-five-story Ryugyong Hotel is hideous, dominating the Pyongyang skyline like some twisted North Korean version of Cinderella’s castle. Not that you would be able to tell from the official government photos of the North Korean capital — the hotel is such an eyesore, the Communist regime routinely covers it up, airbrushing it to make it look like it’s open — or Photoshopping or cropping it out of pictures completely’

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Bridges are spaces. Bridges are places, where people meet other people, enjoy their surroundings, and experience being part of a community. Though a mode of transit, bridges can be magnets for public activity and fun. Bridges not only connect land to land, but also have an impact on adjacent parks, industries and residential communities, and interact with the city’s transportation infrastructure. Andrea Palladio, the great 16th century Italian architect and engineer, hit on the essence of bridge building when he said “…bridges should befit the spirit of the community by exhibiting commodiousness, firmness, and delight.”

Bridge: n. a structure carrying a road, path or railway across a river, road, etc.
Origin: OE Brycg, of G
mc origin.
National Bridge Inspection Standard (NBIS) defines a bridge as a structure of length 20 feet or grea
ter

Bridges have played an important role in the history of human settlement. The first bridges were natural, such as the huge rock arch that spans the Ardèche in France, or Natural Bridge in Virginia (USA). The first man-made bridges were tree trunks laid across streams in girder fashion, flat stones, such as the clapper bridges of Dartmoor in Devon (UK), or festoons of vegetation, twisted or braided and hung in suspension found in India, Africa and South America. As the time passed, horses became plentiful; wagons and carriages were available; roads were built. Then it was that the rivers became barriers to transportation. Ferries were established and did very well for a while, but eventually it became evident that bridges must be built.


Man has come a long way from tree trunk bridges.

While artists and engineers, cities and countries compete to build technological masterpieces spanning across rivers, oceans or connecting cities and countries; people come up with innovative ways of using them. Though designed and built by the Department of Transportation, bridges are a peoples’ domain.

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img_17634.jpgAmong the admirable and enjoyable sights to be found along the sidewalks of big cities, the ingenious adaptations of old buildings for new uses is the most enduring one. A glance on the patina of the old walls of these buildings evokes nostalgia. For a moment, the stone whispers the stories of the days long gone, the life stories of the generations of people who have lived in and around it. These buildings give a character to the neighborhood, visually pleasing and cohesive. It is in this context, the old buildings play an irreplaceable role in creating an image of the city: a sense of place, a sense of belonging.

How would it be to wake up one morning to find that your neighborhood has been replaced by the ‘modern’ buildings? The familiar old building that you walked past everyday and got accustomed with, is no longer there to offer solace. You feel you have lost a friend; you feel you have been alienated in your own home. What surrounds you now are the new ‘high-tech’ buildings, which are like babies- charming but nothing to tell.

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